I just spent 30 minutes picking up broken glass…

…and I was happy to do it. Here’s why:

We never gave Sam sippy cups or anything like them. He has a few melamine dishes but for the most part we give him the real stuff and have since he was, oh, about seven months old. I believe (and it is part of the Montessori educational philosophy, which is one of the many concepts that have been incorporated into my educational philosophy) that giving children real tools make them feel important and teaches them that they are part of the world. That doesn’t mean that I think using sippy cups teaches children that they are unimportant, but it was a priority for me to use real dishes with my kids. Besides, Sam wouldn’t touch sippies. It’s also worth mentioning that he’s always been careful with dishes, which I’m sure is just part of his personality. Some kids might require a lot more supervision with glass and china, and I know I might not be willing to put forth that effort. But the stars aligned and my ideals matched up with Sam’s needs/wants, so there you have it.

In nearly three years since he started eating solids and drinking water from a cup, three or four things have been broken. TOTAL. (Not counting stuff that Will and I have broken. Which is probably about the same. Making Sam our equal.)

So just now, when I gave him some ice in a bowl at the bar and he dropped it, shattering it all over the carpet? I was not thrilled at having to clean it up, but only because (nearly) seven months pregnant is really no time to be on hands and knees picking up shards of glass. I had to take a couple breaks. But a broken bowl is really not such a big deal.

***

I wrote this on Friday and didn’t publish it for fear that it comes across as smug rather than anecdotal. But now I’m thinking it comes across fine. I hope I’m right!

8 thoughts on “I just spent 30 minutes picking up broken glass…

  1. uccellina

    October 27, 2009 at 12:00pm

    We use sippy cups and plastic bowls, but I completely agree with you. Our kids throw their bowls and cups, but I bet they wouldn’t if doing so had real consequences, like shattered china. As in many other arenas, using sippy cups and plastic bowls was a parenting compromise between Husband and me.

    And I don’t think you sound smug.

  2. georgia

    October 27, 2009 at 12:19pm

    oh, what i wouldn’t give for a child who was careful with dishes. any dish. when H is done with something he yells “all done!” and HURLS it from his chair. he has broken 2 thermoses, several dishes including melamine ones… UG! his kleen kanteen looks like it’s been through a war zone.

    i totally agree with you though. and i love the montessouri philosophy. my aunt is a montessouri teacher. she’s my model for what a good mom is (since mine is so crappy).

  3. oslowe

    October 27, 2009 at 2:45pm

    I’m just glad this is a flashback post, because I was reading it thinking: “Wow, again? Really? That is so unlike him!”

  4. Annika

    October 27, 2009 at 3:02pm

    If it had happened again I would not have blogged about it. I would have called you in tears. ONCE WAS PLENTY.

  5. amie

    October 28, 2009 at 2:51pm

    Yeah, sippies over here though boob is still prefered and bottles NEVER happened. She does like to drink out of “real stuff” but mostly just to play. She is really into throwing things so real dishes don’t work so much for her.

  6. Cindy

    October 28, 2009 at 4:03pm

    Karlie is like some of the kids in these responses. Not only does she throw her cup when she’s completely done but also every time she takes a drink. We call her “Destructo Girl”. However, I’m glad Sam’s personality has meshed with your priorities. And no, you didn’t sound smug. You quite gave the impression that if Sam had had a different personality, you would have adapted to it. Which is also cool. And not smug.

  7. courtney

    October 29, 2009 at 10:47pm

    I don’t think there is anything remotely smug about this entry.

    I believe (and it is part of the Montessori educational philosophy, which is one of the many concepts that have been incorporated into my educational philosophy) that giving children real tools make them feel important and teaches them that they are part of the world.

    I don’t know if I will ever be a mom, but I’m remembering that & filing it away.

  8. Lucretia

    October 30, 2009 at 12:34pm

    Not at all smug. Quite impressive! Considering I’ve gone through life breaking dishes and glasses all over the place.

    I really should be studying more educational philosophy on my course. Thank you for your input to my education!

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